Posts tagged "comics"

Spider-Man Molecule

 I bit ago I reblogged an image of the periodic table of superpowers. Here it is again.

In this table origins and powers are arranged as if they were elements. As suggested with OAFSISpVxVhSn and XWxHSn I very much enjoyed it began picking out compounds to form my favorite hero Spider-Man. After him Batman, Hulk, Green Lantern, and so on. While I LOVE this table, The atomic numbers seem to have no meaning at all. Also some powers like strength and speed are traits even the non super powered have. You and I for example. So every hero/villain should have them. With the origins many fall into more than one. Same goes for powers. Technology could cover weaponry, gadgetry, and armor. Also at what point is an element applicable to a hero. Few would argue  that Batman shouldn’t have gadgetry. Should Spider-Man? His web shooters and spider tracers are gadgets. They are both vigilantes. Or does Bats affiliation with the Justice league and Spidey’s avenger times make them each not? There is much room for debate. While not perfect, it did get me wondering what a molecule made form these elements might look like.

So attempting to avoid these debates and avoid the glaring reasons this is not science I tossed some elements from the chart together into a Spider-Man molecule. My first attempt looked like this: ScRdSSpAgPcGe Sc=Scientist Rd=Radiation S=Strength Sp=Speed Ag=Agility Pc=Precognition Ge=Intelligence. I chose to always list the origin first. Followed by physical then mental powers. In sort of a Hill system. A attempt at the structure of the molecule came out like this:

         Ag   S
            \  /
       Sc=Rd-Pc
      /     /
    Ge   Sp   

        
Like the character I start with the origin elements and bond the powers elements to the origin element most responsible for the power. Here we have The two origin elements in the center. A covalent bond shows bond between origins. Elements from the powers sections bond to the origin element most responsible for it’s being there. The double bond was chosen not only to show that those elements are origin elements but also to show which element came first in the characters story. In the Peter Parker example above Sc and it’s attached Ge came before Rd and it’s attached elements so it is placed on the left.

With an atomic weight for these elements We could measure the most “powerful” characters in theory based on total weight. This would still only assume that each hero molecule would have one atom of each element. This hardly seems correct as The Hulk should have much more S than Spider-Man. For this I turned to some old Marvel data I had. The power ratings from an issue of Marvel Encyclopedia Spider-Man. We get ScRdS4Sp4Ag7PcGe4.

Only having number values for some of the powers and lacking a rating for others say, Pc of which Spidey has but not as powerful as others. This is not really science. Nor is it accurate. I am considering analyzing this further with a chemist friend of mine.

How many Spidey comics?

 I am and have always been a huge fan of Spider-Man. Over the years friends and family have given me a large amount of Spider-Man related gifts. Most of these I have in my apartment. Friends are often overwhelmed by the number of Spider-Man or comic book related items I own. This often leads to an innocent but odd question. “Do you have like every Spider-Man comic book ever?” they ask. To have every one of anything publication with over 70 years of constant publishing is a lot to accomplish. To assume that I would have the resources to do so when they know me and my lifestyle seems odd to me. Perhaps they jsut didn’t think of the logistics of their question.

 The story of Peter Parker the Amazing Spider-Man goes all the way back to 1963 with his first appearance in Amazing Fantasy #15. No surprise to anyone that there is a ton of adventures that have been told. Even your non Spidey fan can guess that once a month for nearly 50 years will give you quite the back story. What they fail to realize is the amount of story they are imagining is only for the title Amazing Spider-Man. Your casual Parker follower will tell you that in Marvel comics a story arc can be spread over several titles all released in the same month, in a effort to get readers to buy more comics and get the whole story. For example a Spider-Man story could start in the Amazing Spider-Man title, continue in an Incredible Hulk comic, and end in a Invincible Iron Man comic. With part of the events told or referenced in Uncanny X-Men. All in the same month or through multiple months. It’s the idea of a Marvel universe allows all the characters to coexist and interact. In the early days of DC, Metropolis and Gotham had nothing to do with each other. Marvel introduces this idea and it makes for good storytelling. DC soon does the same. Not only did this make for interesting super powered team ups and adventures. But allows Marvel to send a character or even a whole story arc into multiple comics to boost the sales of a lagging or newly launched title. But this story telling and sales gimmick is used in even just a single characters story. Spider-Man was especially taken advantage of. At point fans having to buy up to 5 Spider-Man comics to get that months story. This does not mean that at points elements to the story were not in non Spider-Man comics. This chart shows this comic book story telling/sales device. Each bubble is a Spider-Man comic book title relevant to the overall main Spider-Man Story. There are Spider-Man comic books with a story beginning and ending with in the comic. These “one shots” are counted if that story is relevant to the greater story of Spider-Man. (“Marvel-Team Up” counted among them as Spider-Man was in most issues and the stories often were parts of a greater story through the other titles.) Judging of the relevance of a Spider-Man title was left to the good folks at Spider-Fan.org and is subject to change with new comic book titles and developments in the continuing Spider-Man writings. The size of the bubble represents the number of issues in the title. Amazing Spider-Man being the largest. The larger ones have the number of issues at the time of the chart. Some are still counting. The Amazing Spider-Man title was restarted when Marvel decided to restart their long running comic books issue numbers. The plan being a sales boost of “Number #1” issues. Title numbers started over as Volume #2. This title and the other were later restored sort of. Volume 1 and 2 are separate bubbles in this chart. Also Any other universe is not included. This is a chart for Earth 616. That is what the “normal” universe is called to distinguish it from the “Ultimate” universe or other timelines. While the whole process of alternate universe and timelines can get convoluted 616 is the Spider-Man most people grew up with. The task of collecting all these comics would be difficult. The time involved would be great. While the financial burden would be primarily limited to the older comics that burden is not to be taken lightly. Most importantly the first appearance of Spider-Man Amazing Fantasy #15. The first few issues of Amazing Spider-Man are expensive as well.  After that the issues are quite affordable. This graph shows the value of a near perfect grade Amazing Spider-Man comic book from Amazing Spider-Man #1 to issue #150. Only a handful of issues out side the first few are worth large sum of money. Issue #1 in perfect condition goes for well over a 100k. After that the prices drop dramatically. Few even go for 1k. The first appearance of other characters mostly. But Amazing Spider-Man #14 the first appearance of the Green Goblin is the only one of note.

A third concern has kept me from the obsessive collecting that part of me longs for. Namely space. American comic books are 17 x 26 cm. With varying thickness. Most average collectors buy cardboard boxes to protect their treasured books. They come in sizes meant to keep your valuables from and damage from shifting when moved. A long box at Amazon(seen here) holds 200 to 225 comic books. This means for just Amazing Spider-Man I would need at three boxes at the time of the bubble chart data. Each one of these boxes are 27.25 inches long X 7.5 inches wide X 10.8 inches high.

 The volume they would take up, is  2207.25 cubic inches or 1.27 cubic feet of space. This means on order to own and store my complete Amazing Spider-Man collection I would lose 3.81 cubic feet of space. Add the rest of the comics in the bubble chart above and I stand to lose 8.89 cubic feet of space. While that is a amount of space I can live with out it will only grow as the titles continue and new titles are created. The loss of space is only the first concern. With having so much time and money invested in these comics, I will have to protect them from moisture, heat, pests, light, and who can say what kind of potential harm. The most rare are so expensive it would be foolish to keep them in simple cardboard boxes. Protective cases would be in order resulting in more money spent and more space lost.  

 All of these things are factors when a friend sees my enthusiasm for Spider-Man and asks ” So do you have like Every Spider-Man comic?”. Given the price of the the most expensive Amazing Spider-man comic books and the sheer number of issues it would be quite the task to collect every one. Factor in the price and and overwhelming number of issues in the rest of Spider-Man titles published and we are now looking at quite the investment. The storage, plus the care needed to protect said collection and the fact that it will only grow leaves quite the task. These kind of logistics are not often thought of in innocently asked questions between friends. 

Over Analyzing a piece of a comic book.


I began reading through classic 60’s and 70’s Amazing Spider-Man comics with a gift from a girl years ago. She bout me Essential Spider-Man. A collection of black and white reprints from Amazing Spider-Man #1 - #40. Since then I have just about all of the Spider-Man comics. Amazing, Web of, Sensational, not to mention a ton of one shots and crossover stuff. I noticed after a conversation with a friend that after all this reading about Peter’s adventures I knew New York fairly well for someone that has never been. I could remember the lay out of the streets where many of the land marks were. From Battery to Harlem, from Hoboken to Queens, I had an idea of the geography. Completely from reading comics. I was told that while that could prove useful some day it really was over analyzing the comics. My friend was right but I didn’t see that as a bad thing. It was fun for me. So I started a google map of what I considered important places from the Spider-Man comics. Finding the listed addresses when I could and arranging my map first in New York then on. As far away as the Savage land and a close to my home as a few hours away. Spidey sure travels for a broke nerd. But one point on the map has always been the most fun for me. A point I have in New Mexico where I have the location of the failed first attempt by the Green Goblin to defeat Spider-Man. At least my estimation.
 
My reasoning is based on clues from the comic. More specifically Amazing Spider-Man #14 the first appearance of the Green Goblin. In the comic the Green Goblin looking to make a name for himself among the criminals, devised a plan to eliminate Spider-Man. He would lure him to Hollywood under the pretence that a Spider-Man movie was to be made. The movie was to be shot on location in the dessert as called for by the script. This was where the Goblin would defeat Spider-Man. Robbing Spidey of tall buildings to swing from and making him a sitting duck to the flight enabled Green Goblin. What was not in the script was running into the Hulk was happened to be hiding in a nearby cave. There is a brief skirmish and nobody wants to fight the Hulk so the Goblin runs and Spidey ends up in a pond in the cave.
The location was never exactly given. Only that it was New Mexico. Starting there to find the location I found a area that advertised that it had been used for location shoots many times in the past. At the filmography page for FilmNewMexico.com located here. New Mexico has long been popular as a filming location. The westerns of the 60’s and 70’s and many films since the 1900’s have been shot in Land of Enchantment.  Recently the desert surrounding near Albuquerque were used for 2007’s No Country for Old Men. Starting from there I used Google maps topographical view to follow up to an area with possible caves. One area on the outskirts of the Santa Fe National Forrest had what seemed to be caves and running water. This fits with the story in that the mileage from town was not so great as not to be able to drive there and back. Also that there were large caves with a water source. Desert, with water, and hills for caves this area suits the scene not perfectly but well.

It is here I placed my marker and approximate this battle to have taken place. This area seemed to have possibility for caves and a large pooling source of water. It is known area for filming and reasonably near Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Those factors combined that much filming has taken place in the area before the writing of Amazing Spider-Man #14 in 1964 leaves this place as likely candidate.

View full map of important locations with in the Spider-Man comic books as listed by me:


View Spider-Man locations here a larger map

Reading comic books or anything for that matter is always an opportunity to go further and really over think what the story’s technical details.

ilovecharts:

Via Jeff Mason

ilovecharts:

Via Jeff Mason

300k crime fighting

I have had a preoccupation with super heroes and their powers for some time now. After reading Ironman and Batman I have wondered how much is Super Powers a factor really? There are Many Super Powered beings in comics. Some born that way like Superman. Some got their power later in life. Spider-Man! While a brave few run with the heavy hitters with no super powers to speak of. Batman.

With no healing factor, super strength, or speed to protect them, how is it they are still important and effective members of the hero community? Not only does the hero side have non super powered members, but the villains as well. The Joker, Lex Luthor, Dr. Doom. Plenty of characters. they all have somethings in common. First to get by with super powered pros each one of them relies on technology to bridge the gap between normal or even peak human abilities and super powers. Some use technology as an accessory. Batman, Joker, the Punisher. Other go all tech. Like Ironman of Dr. Doom. Head to toe tech. All offence and defence relies on a suit. The second thing they all need is information. From the Joker planning the perfect crime to Lex running LexCorp’s less than legal activities, even the Punisher gets intel fed to him form a nerd in a van. But is that all it takes? Some nerd on the other end of a mic and some money invested in some gadgets and weapons? How much money? What could anyone even get with out being a super genius like your Starks and Luthors.

People have made super powered suits. Here is one that makes you super strong. But as few other than Ironman seem to worry about that neither will we. We are going to need to be mobile to get to crimes if we are to stop them. The Batmobile would be nice but the Punishers battle van is more practical and is something you might already have. So any vehicle will do really. Fancy computers and weapons on board are an option. Once at the scene we still need mobility greater than the criminals in order to gain advantage. Just a google search aways and easily purchased is a Jet Pack($200,000 includes training). This can get us roof top access anywhere with out being seen. Essential if comics have shown me anything. Now that we are close to the action chasing down a criminal or even getting away can be the difference between life and death. Boots allowing us to run at 22 mph. Russian inventor created some. Not successful as a consumer product he tried a smaller version. Also a dud. His vision was for commuting like rollerblades. They are not for sale commercially but he might have some left to sell. So we will guess they were to compete with that product price wise. Rollerblades range in price from about $100 on up. These boots are special so a fair price but not so out of range of rollerblades $1000 sound fair. Defence is very important. Dodging bullets is part of the job. Small arms stopping is the best you can hope for and still have the ability to move. Unless you can build some Stark level armor. I can’t. Yet. So for mobility perhaps a Suit from Miguel Caballero will work. I could not find a price on the jackets but a bullet proof polo goes for 4,000. So I am guessing at least 10,000. Bullet proof and stylish! Very important. Offence: We have a lot of options here. I like the non Punisher non lethal approach. If you want to go his route the sky is the limit with guns and bombs and knives and lasers even. But for here are some self explanatory options. Net Gun(build one for $75). Catches bad guys just like flies. Or the Sonic Blaster($300) and blow their eardrums until they surrender. If things get close and you need to kick it up a notch with something a little more closer to lethal then I like the Wrist Flame Thrower(can’t be more than $100)

looks cool/reminds me of Pyro fromt he X-Men comics and the Captive Bolt Pistol($1,500). While both could kill someone the flame thrower is small and more than likely just scare and maybe burn them. Looks cool.  The Bolt pistol as seen in No Country For Old Men could be hooked up to the Jet Pack and pressure adjusted for non lethal attacks. A changeable add on to the end could also soften the blow to knocking unconscious level. Like a pressure powered padded brass knuckles. There plenty of add ons one could use. Maybe the most important part of the non super powered is intelligence and the foresight to be prepared.  Taking a page out of the Bat’s book. A Utility Belt($15) can be filled with all sorts of small weapons, tools, chemicals, or anything that could prove useful. In order to know what to take in said belt, some recon would have to happen. A standard of supplies may be tailored to the type of crimes you generally fight. Keeping you abreast of things you can’t see would be tremendously useful in keeping you alive. For this I like the Fighter pilot Helmet. No price as of yet but much less awesome helmets with no HUD go for 2k a piece. So this helmet must be worth a lot more. I think it’s 50 times better and using that number that I made up and no math, I will budget $50,000. Plenty of information can be fed to you via it’s display. A small computer would have to strapped to you, most like just above the Jet Pack and with out knowing the computational needs of this component I will not estimate the cost. Nor will I estimate the cost of software writing for the helmet to work as I have little to no information on the specific helmet. Any additions like night vision or booby traps if the helmet is disturbed from covering your face I consider optional and will not estimate those costs. Any accessories costs, lock picks, smoke bombs, etc.. will not be included on this price tag. So far we have

  • Jet Pack $200,000(includes training)
  • Boots $1,000
  • Built proof suit $10,000
  • Net gun $75
  • Sonic blaster $300
  • Wrist flame thrower $100
  • Bold gun for punching $1,500
  • Utility belt $15
  • Fighter pilot helmet $50,000(total guess)

Under 300k And with that you could build a pretty neat suit, fly, and beat up small time crooks I think. You would be very stupid to try as it is not legal. Studying combat tactics and strategies would be a good idea as well. Having a nerd feeding you information such as police reports, building floor plans, or how to do anything you might have seconds to learn (defusing a bomb) could really up your effectiveness. But like Oracle for Batman, Microchip for the Punisher quality help is hard to find. Good luck in that department. You could save two thirds by not using a jet pack but not nearly as cool. Perhaps Tony Stark should look into this.

 Looks like there is some movie kind of about this. I don’t really watch new movies much so google it I guess.

Spider Fashion

Spider-Man has had more than a few looks over the years. I find it tough to explain to people some of the differences between these to non Spider-Man fans. Not to mention folks who cant tell Carnage from the Scarlet Spider! So I made a quick slide show. Click Here for a full screen presentation. Impress your friends. 

 
    Enjoy!

Spider-Ham


Spider-Ham Shown

I took this photo at Universal Studios Florida. On the Spider-Man ride is this wanted poster for the Hobgoblin is present along with various signs for the Daily Bugle. I have been aware of this photo for some time now. Only in seeing it did my mind really start to wonder.
The ride opened in 1999. It is very cool and in 3-D. VERY cool. At this time the Hobgoblin had been a character in the Marvel universe for 19 years.The original Hobgoblin was named Roderick Kingsley. For his own safety Mr. Kingsley brainwashed a reporter for the Daily Bugle named Ned Leeds and used him as the Hobgoblin for some time. This to whom I assume the wanted poster refers. Ned Leeds was introduced in 1964. A reporter he followed the Hobgoblin after a battle only to be captured and brainwashed. Ned would be Kingsley’s pawn until Jason Macendale(at this time known as the villain Jack O’ Lantern) had Ned killed in Berlin. Macendale, then usurping the role of Hobgoblin.
The most obvious mistake is a wanted poster for a man that would have been dead by the time his identity was known. Ned’s life as the Hobgoblin was unknown to all(except Kingsley and the Foreigner who arranged the hit) until the time of his murder in Berlin. The story of the Hobgoblin is a complicated one. For a visual understanding please see the embedded goblin timeline below. Full version of time line here(work in progress will be updated with more recent goblin activities.)




As shown on the time line here the Hobgoblin villain was introduced in 1983. Ned Leeds was introduced in 1964. This Ned Leeds was identified as the villain in 1987. For 12 years it was common knowledge that Ned was the Hobgoblin before his death and for 32 years his name was Ned in the comics. Ned can be short for Edward, Edwin, Edgar, or Edmund. Even so with 32 years of Ned as his name why post him as Edward?
Thus far my attempts at answers have yielded little. I was unable to track down who makes these posters or who would have designed them. I have made a possible step in correcting the problem by making the editor at Marvel.com aware of this problem. Done via twitter @Agent_M was outraged but could not promise he had the power to fix this. Here is his blog.
On a positive note I do enjoy that the photo is most likely a Parker photo. Shot in mid battle it appears and at a downward angle from above while flying his glider. A shot that Peter Parker is most likely to get. 
This is not the first time someone has noticed this error. Here is a section from wikipedia on the Hobgoblin.
Attractions
Hobgoblin can be seen in the Islands of Adventure ride The Amazing Adventures of Spider-Man as one of the villains. A wanted poster for him may be seen during the waiting period of the ride, which incorrectly identifies him as Edward Leeds. Outside the ride, in the main Marvel Super Hero Island area, a giant picture of the Hobgoblin on his glider is attached to a building and is one of the main pieces of decoration.

I took this photo at Universal Studios Florida. On the Spider-Man ride is this wanted poster for the Hobgoblin is present along with various signs for the Daily Bugle. I have been aware of this photo for some time now. Only in seeing it did my mind really start to wonder.

The ride opened in 1999. It is very cool and in 3-D. VERY cool. At this time the Hobgoblin had been a character in the Marvel universe for 19 years.The original Hobgoblin was named Roderick Kingsley. For his own safety Mr. Kingsley brainwashed a reporter for the Daily Bugle named Ned Leeds and used him as the Hobgoblin for some time. This to whom I assume the wanted poster refers. Ned Leeds was introduced in 1964. A reporter he followed the Hobgoblin after a battle only to be captured and brainwashed. Ned would be Kingsley’s pawn until Jason Macendale(at this time known as the villain Jack O’ Lantern) had Ned killed in Berlin. Macendale, then usurping the role of Hobgoblin.

The most obvious mistake is a wanted poster for a man that would have been dead by the time his identity was known. Ned’s life as the Hobgoblin was unknown to all(except Kingsley and the Foreigner who arranged the hit) until the time of his murder in Berlin. The story of the Hobgoblin is a complicated one. For a visual understanding please see the embedded goblin timeline below. Full version of time line here(work in progress will be updated with more recent goblin activities.)

As shown on the time line here the Hobgoblin villain was introduced in 1983. Ned Leeds was introduced in 1964. This Ned Leeds was identified as the villain in 1987. For 12 years it was common knowledge that Ned was the Hobgoblin before his death and for 32 years his name was Ned in the comics. Ned can be short for Edward, Edwin, Edgar, or Edmund. Even so with 32 years of Ned as his name why post him as Edward?

Thus far my attempts at answers have yielded little. I was unable to track down who makes these posters or who would have designed them. I have made a possible step in correcting the problem by making the editor at Marvel.com aware of this problem. Done via twitter @Agent_M was outraged but could not promise he had the power to fix this. Here is his blog.

On a positive note I do enjoy that the photo is most likely a Parker photo. Shot in mid battle it appears and at a downward angle from above while flying his glider. A shot that Peter Parker is most likely to get. 

This is not the first time someone has noticed this error. Here is a section from wikipedia on the Hobgoblin.

Attractions

Hobgoblin can be seen in the Islands of Adventure ride The Amazing Adventures of Spider-Man as one of the villains. A wanted poster for him may be seen during the waiting period of the ride, which incorrectly identifies him as Edward Leeds. Outside the ride, in the main Marvel Super Hero Island area, a giant picture of the Hobgoblin on his glider is attached to a building and is one of the main pieces of decoration.

Education in the Marvel Universe

I remember being impressed with smart resourceful heroes in comics. Batman, Iron Man, and mostly Spider-Man. Parker’s use of science and love for it have bailed him out of more situations than his spider powers ever have. His education level as listed at Marvel.com is College graduate (biophysics major), doctorate studies in biochemistry (incomplete). Wondering about the education levels of other heroes and the villains they fight I began to search the wiki at Marvel’s site.

This chart is was started from what I considered major characters in the Marvel universe. Using the education listings I could find I was left with 83 total. Heroes in blue and Villains in red. While there are characters I would have liked to add on this chart, the listing for education level was unavailable at the site at this time. Speculation on the education levels and intelligence of characters was something that I was not willing to do as it could lead to debate over accuracy. Instead I leave it to the writers and the contributors on the Marvel wiki.

The first thing that surprised me was the number of unfinished undergrads in the heroes category. 7 out of the 83 but the villains had no college drop outs. Villains only had one more high school grad but ended up with a near 50% higher rate for college graduation. Post graduate work on the other hand seemed to go to the Heroes. Grad school work in general was about a tie except for grad school drop outs. Heroes with three and villains with none. PhD holders were the about the same but multiple PhD holders was a three to nothing win for heroes. In the multiple PhD category the Heroes have three. Villains none.

From all this it seems the villains more dedicated to college work up to the Grad school level. As Grad schools are not fond of giving a super villain a honorary degree it makes sense that they have no multiple PhD holders. Perhaps it is the time in life when leaving college and looking for work for the first time in your field that leads these people to a life of crime. Competition is tough and many of these villains were not so skilled outside their labs. Tough economy and a growing number of college grads competing for jobs have forced many entering the job market to choose something out side of their degree. Often a life of crime using the skills gained in college is an alternative. Whether shunned by schools for research and ideas that seemed uninteresting or impractical these downtrodden can still find use for their intelligence adapting any skills or inventions to criminal gains. Everything from setting out on your own as a one person crime spree or selling your services and wares to those with means but not the ingenuity for science based crime.

The second thing that really stood out was the lower end of the education. Heroes had twice as many high school drop outs. Being a longtime fan of the Marvel universe as a whole I knew these characters and their back stories before hand. On their own each never seemed like anything odd. But with in this chart I saw that of the 7 total high school drop 4 were black characters. Tyrone Johnson (Cloak), Carl Lucas; legally changed to Luke Cage, Sam Wilson (Falcon), and Lonnie Thompson Lincoln (Tombstone). Tandy Bowen (Dagger)and William Baker;Flint Marko (Sandman), Wade Wilson (Deadpool) were the only white characters to drop out of high school. (not counting the two with no education at all, Rhino and Gambit both white and never enrolled to drop out.) Deciding to check the college results only 6 with at least some college or private tutoring where non white. Of the 7 total black characters only 1 (Storm) went to college(College-level courses at Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters and I am not sure Xavier’s school is accredited.), 2 have High-school equivalent and the rest(4) are drop outs. I do NOT think Marvel is racist at all. I am not white and am a huge fan and find it hard to believe that Marvel would have been forcing writers to create characters with little to no formal education. Nor do I believe the writers purposely wrote black characters as uneducated as a rule. A good example is William “Bill” Barrett Foster(Goliath) who holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from California Technical Institute. Also many of these characters are highly intelligent despite their lack of formal education. That being said I went to find out how close this was to reality. Quick Google search and… The drop out rate for black Americans varies but has been reported as high as 40%. Many go back and finish later in life. According to infoplease.com, “83% Among single-race blacks 25 and older, the proportion who had at least a high school diploma in 2008.” and “20% Percentage of single-race blacks 25 and older who had a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2008.” This chart gives us a rate of 57% with no high school. and 14% with at least some college. Marvel’s numbers are not so far off from the America’s. At least not so far off to warrant calling Marvel biased in the eduction levels of characters by race. These characters that dropped out still could go back and finish high school or go on and finish college. I would like to see more education and diversity. As I need inspiration to go to school and tend to listen to comics more than people.

Education is very important in the Marvel universe. All the most popular characters are very intelligent and well educated. The titles that have been popular with a main character that has no college have been few. Ghost Rider and Blade are the only two that I have been able to come up with as a popular title with only a high school education. Hazzah to Marvel for making education such a important part of it’s universe and for what I am guessing is unintentionally representing a problem in America’s education system.

Here is the full list of heroes/villains.

Name	Education level	Hero/Villain
Peter Benjamin Parker (Spider-Man) Unfinished Grad School Hero
Reed Richards (Mr. Fantastic) Multiple PhD Hero
Donald Blake( Thor Odinson)(Thor) PhD Hero
Stephen Vincent Strange (Dr. Strange) PhD Hero
Henry "Hank" P. McCoy PhD Hero
Anthony Stark (Iron Man) Multiple PhD Hero
Jennifer "Jen" Walters Jameson PhD Hero
Bruce David Banner (Hulk) PhD Hero
Steven "Steve" Rogers (Captain America) High School Graduate Hero
Benjamin Jacob Grimm (The Thing) College graduate Hero
Scott Summers (Cyclops) Unfinished Grad School Hero
Charles Francis Xavier (Professor X) Multiple PhD Hero
Robert "Bobby" Louis Drake (Iceman) Grad School Graduate Hero
Anna Marie (full name unrevealed) (Rouge) Unfinished Grad School Hero
Katherine "Kitty" Pryde (Shadowcat) Unfinished Undergrad Hero
Jean Grey-Summers (Phoenix) College graduate Hero
Warren Kenneth Worthington III (Angel) College graduate Hero
Jubilation Lee (Jubilee) Unfinished Undergrad Hero
Piotr Nikolaievitch Rasputin (Colossus) Unfinished Undergrad Hero
Elizabeth "Betsy" Braddock (Psylocke) College graduate Hero
Kurt Wagner (Nightcrawler) Unfinished Undergrad Hero
Ororo Munroe (Storm) Unfinished Undergrad Hero
Emma Grace Frost College graduate Hero
Remy Etienne LeBeau (Gambit) None Hero
Felicia Hardy (Black Cat) College graduate Hero
Matthew Michael Murdock (Daredevil) PhD Hero
Eric Brooks (Blade) High School Graduate Hero
Wade Wilson (Deadpool) High school dropout Hero
Nicholas Joseph Fury (Nick Fury) High School Graduate Hero
Johnathon "Johnny" Blaze (Ghost Rider) High School Graduate Hero
Howard (full name unrevealed) (Howard the Duck) College graduate Hero
Susan Storm Richards (Invisible Woman) Unfinished Undergrad Hero
Jonathan Lowell Spencer "Johnny" Storm (Human Torch) College graduate Hero
Doctor Michael Morbius (Morbius) PhD Hero
Hobie Brown (Prowler) High School Graduate Hero
Frank Castle born Castiglione (Punisher) High School Graduate Hero
Silver Sablinova (Sliver Sable) College graduate Hero
James Howlett (Wolverine) Private Tutoring Hero
Thomas Fireheart (Puma) Grad School Graduate Hero
Marc Spector (Moon Knight) High School Graduate Hero
Elektra Natchios Unfinished Undergrad Hero
Tyrone Johnson (Cloak) High school dropout Hero
Tandy Bowen (Dagger) High school dropout Hero
Carl Lucas; legally changed to Luke Cage High school dropout Hero
Carlos LaMuerto (Black Tarantula) Grad School Graduate Villain
Cletus Kasady (Carnage) High School Graduate Villain
Karl Amadeus Mordo (Baron Mordo) Private Tutoring Villain
Roderick Kingsley (Hobgoblin ) College graduate Villain
Norman Osborn (Green Goblin) College graduate Villain
Cain Marko (Juggernaut) High School Graduate Villain
Sergei Kravinoff (Kraven) College graduate Villain
Yuriko Oyama (Lady Deathstrike) Private Tutoring Villain
Unrevealed (Mandarin) College graduate Villain
Nathaniel Essex (Mr. Sinister) College graduate Villain
Quentin Beck (Mysterio) High School Graduate Villain
St. John Allerdyce (Pyro) College graduate Villain
Aleksei Mikhailovich Sytsevich (Rhino) None Villain
MacDonald "Mac" Gargan (Venom/Scorpion/Sinister Spider-Man) High School Graduate Villain
Otto Gunther Octavius (Doctor Octopus) PhD Villain
Adrian Toomes (Vulture) College graduate Villain
William Baker;Flint Marko (Sandman) High school dropout Villain
Victor von Doom (Doctor Doom) Unfinished Grad School Villain
Maxwell "Max" Dillon (Electro) High School Graduate Villain
Curtis Connors (Lizard) PhD Villain
Herbert Edgar Wyndham (High Evolutionary) Unfinished Grad School Villain
Edward Charles Brock (Venom/Anti-Venom) College graduate Villain
Lonnie Thompson Lincoln (Tombstone) High school dropout Villain
Professor Mendel Stromm (Gaunt) PhD Villain
Miles Warren (Jackal) PhD Villain
Helmut Zemo (Baron Zemo) College graduate Villain
Lester (Bullseye) High School Graduate Villain
Samuel Sterns (Leader) High School Graduate Villain
Fritz von Meyer (Swarm) Unfinished Grad School Villain
Phineas Mason (Tinkerer) College graduate Villain
Justin Hammer Grad School Graduate Villain
Thomas “Tom” Samuel Eamon Cassidy (Black Tom) College graduate Villain
Carl "Crusher" Creel (Absorbing Man) High School Graduate Villain
Franklin Hall (Gravitron) PhD Villain
Kenuichio Harada (Silver Samurai) College graduate Villain
Robert Hunter (Nitro) College graduate Villain
Peter Petruski (Trapster) Grad School Graduate Villain
Dr. Jonathan Ohnn (Spot) PhD Villain

The term "critical thinker" gets thrown around a lot these days. Normally as a positive. When that line of thinking runs longer than a listeners attention span we are accused of over-analyzing.

These posts are what I think about while people are talking to me. Share.
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